Spoke Magazine

Slickoleum suspension grease is now in the webstore

Posted by rodfather on Wednesday April 2 2014

slick-small Now here’s a product that has simply blown me away right off the bat: a multipurpose grease yet specifically designed to “break away” friction in motorcycle suspension forks. Of course this transfers over to our beloved bicycle fork seals and o-rings, as well as dropper posts and any other application where you want two surfaces to remain as slippery as possible. It also reckons it has excellent rust proofing , anti-corrosion and anti-washout qualities, so fantastic to use in your frame’s pivot bearings and gear cables etc. slick-medium

While Slickoleum doesn’t say anything about bottom bracket and wheel bearings, it works pretty good, especially if you have high quality parts and want them running super fast . The only place they don’t promote using it is in high temperature bearings, but on a bicycle, that doesn’t happen so who cares?

DOES IT WORK?
You betcha! Every fork I’ve added this magic jelly to has improved plushness by an easy 20%. With a texture of the most slippery grease before its about to melt, it goes on easy, you don’t need much and you can even rub it into your fork stanchions and it will impregnate the alloy. It is also keeping my gear cables shifting  like new and preventing water and muck from getting into that gear housing.

Is it a new, fandangled, untried product?
Hell no! Since 1990 some of the best suspension companies in the world have been requesting Slickoleum in their products.

You don’t need to pull your forks apart if you don’t have the skills. Just rub it into your stanchions and under that seal lip for a noticeable improvement.

Slickoleum is available in 1 and 8 ounce tubs so whether you’re just a rider, a home mechanic or run a workshop, there is the right sized tub for you.

Buy the 1oz one here, and the 8oz one here.

Categories: Exclusives

  • Mark

    “Improved plushness by 20%”. Where has this report been published?

  • Big G

    I used it on my knob , burns a bit but the plushness was up 20%

  • Andrew

    Plushness… is that an empirical measurement that engineers use, like yield strength, tensile strength etc? :) Stuffed if I know how you measure it though.

  • joe

    Oh calm down. He is estimating based on his experience.